Fr. Barron comments on Gravity (spoiler alert)

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Pope Francis greets the crowd as he arrives to lead his general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Sept. 25. (CNS photo/Paul Haring)

An exclusive, in-depth interview with Pope Francis

An interview of Pope Francis by Jesuit Father Antonio Spadro has garnered a lot of press recently. Here is a link to America magazine's story about the exclusive interview with Pope Francis that took place over three days: Papal Interview

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Pittsburg State Catholic campus ministry to host a centennial celebration on Oct. 5

By Molly Martin of the
Catholic Advance

The St. Pius X Catholic Student Center at Pittsburg State University will host a centennial celebration Saturday, Oct. 5, after the homecoming football game. A Mass will kick-off the celebration about 30 minutes after the conclusion of the football game, which begins at 2 p.m. A cookout will be held after Mass.
The centennial event is a celebration of 100 years of Catholic ministry on the campus of Pittsburg State University.
The Newman Club is the official student organization of the St. Pius X Catholic Student Center and was recognized by the Kansas Teachers College, now Pittsburg State University, in 1917. According to witness testimony, the 50th anniversary was celebrated in 1962-63, so the Catholic ministry has been on campus since 1912-13.
The Newman Club gained a permanent foothold at Pittsburg State when property was purchased in 1953 so students would have a place to congregate. This property was named the Pius X Chapel and Catholic Center. In 1968, the present facility was constructed and blessed by Bishop David Maloney.
“Patronage of St. Pius X was chosen because of his papal motto, ‘Restore All Things in Christ,’” said Father Adam Keiter, chaplain of St. Pius X Catholic Student Center. “So the hope was that the students who participated in the various activities of the Newman Center would go out into the university campus and out into the world, taking with them the light of Jesus Christ...in other words, that all things would truly be restored through faith in Jesus Christ.”
The St. Pius X Student Center, much like the St. Paul Parish and Newman Center at Wichita State University, is growing and preparing for the future. It is experiencing greater participation across the board in programs, and daily Mass attendance has continued to grow for the last three years. Currently, a crowd of around 35 students for daily Mass is normal, which for an operation of their size is “very good,” said Fr. Adam.
“Pope Francis has repeatedly urged Catholics today to preach Jesus Christ to the world, particularly to those who find themselves on the fringes of society,” the chaplain said. “Well, the modern day secular college campus is a very good setting for such evangelization because of the nature of college.”
“Young people today yearn for the truth, and especially young Catholics. So many want to know that the faith of their childhood is something more than what society says it is, so many want to believe that the truths of the faith that were preached to them are something more than archaic superstition or delusion,” Father Keiter said.
“I have found that the Catholic Student Center fills this need quite well, as it provides for the Catholic college student a place of encounter with the living God through prayer and the sacraments. It gives the student a place of fellowship centered around a shared experience of the Catholic faith, and it offers an opportunity for formation in the faith, so that the faith may be expressed with a new ardor and conviction.”

Want to attend the centennial festivities at Pittsburg?
Pittsburg State alums who wish to attend the celebration are requested to make reservations by today, Sept. 20. They may be made by calling the office at (620) 235-1138, by email at amy@catholic
gorillas.org, or online by clicking on the centennial celebration graphic at www.catholicgorillas.org.

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Welcome Back Gorillas!

It's so nice to have some activity back on the PSU campus once again.  I'm looking forward to the semester starting back up and to the great opportunities we will offer here at the St. Pius X Catholic Student Center.  So I invite you all to come by and see how we can help you grow in your faith, meet new friends, expand your horizons and much more!

I want to take this opportunity to share with you some exciting news.  As you can see in the image to the right, the Newman Center has adopted a new logo and is now called the St. Pius X Catholic Student Center.  This change was made after much prayer and discussion, and for the purpose of making the Student Center more visible to the students of Pittsburg State University.  It is an exciting new chapter in the life of the Student Center, and I look forward to offering an explanation of the rich symbolism of the new logo over the next few months.  In the meantime, you will notice some changes to this website, some changes to our communications pieces, but I assure you, we are still the same great organization!  At the St. Pius X Catholic Student Center, we are still trying to do our best to proclaim the beauty and wonder of the Catholic faith to anyone who will listen...still working to bring students into contact with the love of Jesus Christ!

Come by St. Pius X to see what we have to offer, and join us as we make this a fun and memorable year at Pitt State!

 

Fall Book Discussion:  Mondays 7:00pm
The Church and New Media: Blogging Converts, Online Activists, and Bishops Who Tweet

by Brandon Vogt

Facebook has over 750 million users. Twitter hosts more than 350 billion tweets each day. Today alone, people will view more than two billion videos on YouTube. And in the past year, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages.
We're experiencing the most explosive communication shift since the printing press.
What does this mean for the Church?
How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to cultivate community, to change the world?
Following Pope Benedict's call to set sail on the digital continent, The Church and New Media explores the benefits and dangers of New Media, while guiding Christians through this new digital landscape. The book features more than a dozen contributors including:

-- Cardinal Sean O'Malley, O.F.M. Cap. with the book's Foreword
-- Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan with the book's Afterword
-- Brandon Vogt on "the digital continent" and New Media's benefits and dangers
-- Fr. Robert Barron on engaging the secular online world
-- Jennifer Fulwiler on blogging her way from atheism to Catholicism
-- Marcel LeJeune on using New Media to connect young adults with the Church
-- Mark Shea on the benefits and perils of blogging
-- Taylor Marshall on using New Media to unwrap ancient truths
-- Fr. Dwight Longenecker on ecumenical dialogue through New Media
-- Scot Landry on New Media in the diocese
-- Matt Warner on New Media in the parish
-- Lisa Hendey on growing online community
-- Thomas Peters on faithful online activism
-- Shawn Carney on how the world's largest pro-life movement was built using New Media

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We’re in the middle of the biggest communication shift since the advent of the printing press. Facebook has over 750 million users. Three billion YouTube videos are watched every day. And last year alone, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages. What does this all mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to build community, and to change the world?

Following Pope Benedict’s call to embrace the “digital continent,” The Church and New Media will guide you through this new digital landscape. It’s time to engage the digital revolution.

- See more at: http://www.churchandnewmedia.com/#sthash.FlYQSxAF.dpuf

We’re in the middle of the biggest communication shift since the advent of the printing press. Facebook has over 750 million users. Three billion YouTube videos are watched every day. And last year alone, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages. What does this all mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to build community, and to change the world?

Following Pope Benedict’s call to embrace the “digital continent,” The Church and New Media will guide you through this new digital landscape. It’s time to engage the digital revolution.

- See more at: http://www.churchandnewmedia.com/#sthash.FlYQSxAF.dpuf

We’re in the middle of the biggest communication shift since the advent of the printing press. Facebook has over 750 million users. Three billion YouTube videos are watched every day. And last year alone, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages. What does this all mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to build community, and to change the world?

Following Pope Benedict’s call to embrace the “digital continent,” The Church and New Media will guide you through this new digital landscape. It’s time to engage the digital revolution.

- See more at: http://www.churchandnewmedia.com/#sthash.FlYQSxAF.dpuf

We’re in the middle of the biggest communication shift since the advent of the printing press. Facebook has over 750 million users. Three billion YouTube videos are watched every day. And last year alone, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages. What does this all mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to build community, and to change the world?

Following Pope Benedict’s call to embrace the “digital continent,” The Church and New Media will guide you through this new digital landscape. It’s time to engage the digital revolution.

- See more at: http://www.churchandnewmedia.com/#sthash.FlYQSxAF.dpuf

We’re in the middle of the biggest communication shift since the advent of the printing press. Facebook has over 750 million users. Three billion YouTube videos are watched every day. And last year alone, Americans sent 1.8 trillion text messages. What does this all mean for the Church? How can Christians harness these new tools to reach out, to teach, to build community, and to change the world?

Following Pope Benedict’s call to embrace the “digital continent,” The Church and New Media will guide you through this new digital landscape. It’s time to engage the digital revolution.

- See more at: http://www.churchandnewmedia.com/#sthash.FlYQSxAF.dpuf

Msgr. Hemberger Elected Diocesan Administrator
Article from the Catholic Advance

Monsignor Robert Hemberger was elected as the diocesan administrator for the Diocese of Wichita at a meeting Thursday, June 6, in the Chancery in Wichita.
Msgr. Hemberger was elected by the College of Consultors – a group of diocesan priests – because the diocese is without a bishop. The diocese has been a vacant see since May 30, when Bishop Michael O. Jackels was installed as the archbishop of the Archdiocese of Dubuque, Iowa.
“I am reminded of the fear and wonderment that the prophets and Mary felt when asked to do something new for God. But God was with them, “Msgr. Hemberger said. “I sincerely ask the people of the diocese for prayer regularly and patience occasionally.”
He added that he was reassured that “the Diocese of Wichita is in such good condition – faith-filled people, loving stewards, zealous priests, striving parishes, and institutions. Those who have gone before in leadership leave a fine family of faith.”
The job is not new to Msgr. Hemberger. He led the diocese as the administrator from December 2003 to April 2005 – between the departure of Bishop Thomas Olmsted to the Diocese of Phoenix and the ordination of Bishop Jackels on April 4, 2005, as the tenth bishop of the Diocese of Wichita.
Immediately following his acceptance, Msgr. Hemberger – a priest of the diocese for 43 years – took an Oath of Fidelity in the presence of the College of Consultors. Bishop Carlo Maria Vigano, the Apostolic Nuncio to the United States, has been contacted to inform him of Msgr. Hemberger’s election.
Please pray for Msgr. Hemberger in this interim period as the diocese awaits the arrival of a new bishop.

From the Catholic Advance


The elevation of the chalice helps those at Mass focus on the gift that our Lord gives - his very self.
(Advance photo illustration)

Mass can be the highlight of your week; learn more about the Mass

Our minds can wander at Mass. A crying child, inappropriate clothing, nearby whispering, or a cell phone's rap music can easily distract us.

Keeping our minds focused on the Mass is a life-long struggle, but one that can be made easier through a little training.
Father John Lanzrath suggests planning early in the week for the Sunday Mass.

"On Monday or Tuesday, begin reading the Scripture readings for the upcoming Sunday," he said. "Pray with these Scripture readings. Listen to the Lord speak to you and what is happening in your life through Sacred Scripture."

To prepare for the weekend Masses, Fr. Lanzrath recommends listening to Fr. Robert Barron's weekly meditation on the readings at www.wordonfire.org.

"This 13- or 14-minute reflection for the Sunday readings properly prepares yourself for the Sunday Mass. Knowing in advance what the readings will be for the Mass allows one to enter more deeply into the mystery of God's Presence at the Mass through the Liturgy of the Word. Naturally, this allows a deeper entrance prayerfully into the Liturgy of the Eucharist that follows."

Fr. Ken Van Haverbeke agreed with Father Lanzrath about being familiar with the readings, and suggests a person consider this: If I were the priest, what would I preach about?

"Then at Mass, see if the priest's homily is similar to your thoughts," Fr. Van Haverbeke said, "If they were not...you now have two inspirations from the Gospel message." More in the digital Advance here, online here, and in the printed Advance.

Suggested books to learn more about Mass
There are many books available about the Mass and about the Eucharist. And, of course, there are many articles at Catholic websites about the topics. Here are three suggestions:

* "Calvary and the Mass," by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen is free here.
* "The Lamb's Supper: The Mass as Heaven on Earth," by Scott Hahn
* "The Mass: The Glory, the Mystery, the Tradition," by Cardinal Donald Wuerl and Mike Aquilina
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Bishop Jackels appointed archbishop of Archdiocese of Dubuque

 

The Most Rev. Michael O. Jackels, bishop of the Diocese of Wichita has been appointed archbishop of the Archdiocese of Dubuque, Iowa. He will be installed May 30.

Archbishop-elect Jackels said in a statement: "It has been a great experience for me to pray and work with the priests, religious, and lay faithful of the Diocese of Wichita, to yoke ourselves together, sharing responsibility to continue the mission of Jesus in his Church here. Thanks be to God! I am confident that I will be able to say the same about the Catholic faithful in the Archdiocese of Dubuque."

He continued, "It is with no little sadness that I prepare to leave the Diocese of Wichita. But in light of Mary's response to God's call to be the mother of the Savior, or of the example of Pope Francis who cheerfully took up a new and demanding ministry, how could I not say 'yes.' Let us pray for one another in this time of transition."

Monsignor Robert Hemberger, the diocesan moderator of the curia, stated that the diocese is sad Bishop Jackels is leaving us. "During his eight years here, he has worked so hard to get to know the people and customs of this place. He tried to reach out to people of all ages, locations, ethnic groups, and ways of life," he said.

Msgr. Hemberger added that when Bishop Jackels arrived in the diocese he said his primary goal was to help people know Jesus better. "Religious education and formation was his highest priority. He wanted even more for the young people of today than he received as a young person. He felt that way also when teaching adults about Jesus in ways they could relate to and remember.

"When Bishop Jackels first came here, I mentioned that the people of Wichita had been praying for a bishop who is a good shepherd," he said. "The shepherd knows his own, gathers and protects, nourishes and lays down his life. Our prayers were answered. Bishop Jackels did all those things. We wish him well and the church of Dubuque the blessings of what he learned here."

Bishop Jackels was appointed the 10th bishop of the Diocese of Wichita on Jan. 28, 2005, and was ordained on April 4, 2005. Bishop Jackels had been working in Rome for the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith when it was decided he would succeed Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted who had been transferred to the Diocese of Phoenix.

Archbishop-elect Jackels will continue to lead the Diocese of Wichita as its administrator until he is installed in Dubuque. After that time, a diocesan administrator will be selected for Wichita.

The Archdiocese of Dubuque covers 17,403 square miles and consists of 168 parishes and 202,601 Catholics. It has 216 priests and 91 permanent deacons.

Bishop Jackels is also a member of the Subcommittee on the Catechism in the U.S. Conference of Bishops. He succeeds Archbishop Jerome George Hanus, a Benedictine.

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Constant complaining keeps one from noticing Jesus’ presence, pope says

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Complaining frequently and stewing over disappointments can easily become an obsession that blocks one’s view of Jesus’ presence in difficult situations, Pope Francis said.

Celebrating morning Mass April 3 with staff members from the Domus Romana Sacerdotalis, a nearby residence and guesthouse for clergy, Pope Francis preached about the Gospel story from St. Luke about the two disappointed disciples on the road to Emmaus after the death of Jesus.

“They were afraid. All of the disciples were afraid,” he said. As they walked toward Emmaus and discussed everything that had happened, they were sad and complaining.
“And the more they complained, the more they were closed in on themselves: They did not have a horizon before them, only a wall,” the pope said, according to Vatican Radio.
The disciples had had such high hopes that Jesus would be the one who would redeem Israel, but they thought their hopes were destroyed, he said.

“And they stewed, so to speak, their lives in the juice of their complaints and kept going on and on and on with the complaining,” the pope said. “I think that many times when difficult things happen, including when we are visited by the cross, we run the risk of closing ourselves off in complaints.”

When all people can think of is how wrong things are going, Pope Francis said, the Lord is close, “but we don’t recognize him. He walks with us, but we don’t recognize him.”

Like the disciples joined by the risen Lord on the road to Emmaus, people can hear beautiful things, but deep down, they continue to be afraid, the pope said.

“Complaining seems safer. It’s something certain. This is my truth: failure,” he said.

But the Gospel story shows how very patient Jesus is with the disciples, first listening to them and then explaining things step by step, until they see him.

“Jesus does this with us, too,” the pope said. “Even in the darkest moments, he is always with us, walking with us.”

Complaining and griping — about others and about things in one’s own life — is harmful “because it dashes hope. Don’t get into this game of a life of complaints,” he said.
— By Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service

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Easter Sacraments Can Revive Relationships, Pope Teaches

The Pope told a crowd gathered in St. Peter’s Square for the Regina Coeli that the grace from the sacraments received at Easter can renew relationships.

“The grace contained in Easter Sacraments has a huge potential for renewal in personal life, family life and social relations,” Pope Francis said April 1 to a packed Saint Peter’s Square.

He noted that “everything passes through the human heart,” and the sacraments allow people to “receive the grace of the risen Christ,” which gives them the freedom to change those faults that “can hurt me and others.”


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As news of the white smoke spread, about 30 students gathered in the TV Lounge at the Newman Center to watch as Pope Francis was introduced.  After the announcement, the prayers lead by the newly elected Pope and the Papal Blessing, the students went in the chapel and prayed for the new leader.   Then the celebration moved outside where this photo was taken.
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Fr. Barron's First Impression on Pope Francis


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Ring of retired Pope Benedict no longer can be used as seal


The fisherman's ring -- the pope's signet -- is seen on the right hand of Pope Benedict XVI as he celebrates Mass in Havana, Cuba, last year. (CNS/Alessia Giuliani, Catholic Press Photo)

By Carol Zimmermann
Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- When Pope Benedict XVI officially stepped down from office Feb. 28, his wardrobe changed -- right down to the ring on his finger.

He simply stopped wearing the familiar red shoes and the traditional white cassock with a white cape on his shoulder. He also stopped wearing the fisherman's ring, one of the main symbols of the papal office, and went back to wearing an episcopal ring he wore as a cardinal.

But it was not enough to simply leave the papal ring behind.

According to the rules governing the interregnum and election of a pope, the College of Cardinals must "arrange for the destruction of the fisherman's ring and of the lead seal with which apostolic letters are dispatched."

On March 6, Jesuit Father Federico Lombardi, Vatican spokesman, told reporters that this "destruction" had been completed, although he explained that the ring is not smashed or destroyed completely; rather, two deep cuts are made in its face so that it can no longer be used as a seal.

Retired Pope Benedict received the ring at his inauguration Mass along with his pallium, the woolen stole symbolizing a bishop's authority. Both were based on ancient designs.

The gold ring, similar to the old rings that popes used also as seals, was designed by the Rome Association of Goldsmiths. It had Pope Benedict's name etched on it and a scene of St. Peter casting out his net, symbolizing how popes are successors of the apostle Peter.

Many Catholics pay their respects to the pope by kneeling and kissing his ring.

The Catholic Encyclopedia notes that the earliest mention of the fisherman's ring worn by popes is in a letter to Pope Clement IV wrote in 1265 to his nephew, stating that popes were to seal their private letters with "the seal of the fisherman."

During the 15th century, the papal ring also was used to seal official papal documents known as briefs.

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Likely many will want to be home by Palm Sunday

ROME (CNS) - Two U.S. cardinals who will vote in the upcoming papal election say there is no rush to set a date for voting, which could start as late as March 20.

"This is the most important decision that some of us will ever make, and we need to give it the time that's necessary," Cardinal Sean P. O'Malley of Boston told journalists March 5, after the second day of the pre-conclave meeting known as the general congregation.

"I believe the feeling of the cardinals is we want to have enough time in the general congregation so that when we go to the conclave itself, it's a time of a decision," Cardinal O'Malley said. "The general congregation is the time of discernment, and as much time as we need for discernment in prayer, reflection and getting information, then we need to use as much time as we have."

The rules for papal elections state that voting must begin between 15 and 20 days after the Holy See falls vacant; but shortly before he resigned Feb. 28, Pope Benedict XVI issued a decree permitting the cardinals to move the date up if they choose.

Some cardinals have said that starting earlier would be an advantage for residential bishops among the cardinal-electors, since that would make it more likely that they could get back to their dioceses in time for Palm Sunday, March 24.

"The question about trying to be home for Holy Week has to do with simply practical matters," Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston told the same gathering of journalists at the North American College in Rome. "And practical matters always will fall by the wayside when more serious matters are at stake.

"It takes as long as it takes," the cardinal said. "If it takes longer to do the work of discernment that we're supposed to do, it will take that amount of time."

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Thank You, Papa: A Tribute to Pope Benedict XVI

"The Church needs your faith, your idealism, and your generosity, so that she can always be young in Spirit." - Pope Benedict XVI

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Pope's last Angelus:

I will not abandon the Church. I will serve in a different way.


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Your guide to the Conclave Rules
As the princes of the Church, only cardinals have the exclusive responsibility to choose a successor to the Pope. As soon the Sede Vacante begins, Cardinal Dean Angelo Sodano will officially call all able-bodied cardinals to Rome. But only the ones under 80 can take part in the election.

 

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Lent with Fr. Pontifex

Beyond all the things we do or do not do for Lent, the ultimate goal is to have a deeper relationship with Jesus.


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The Legacy of Pope Benedict XVI: A commentary by Fr. Barron

 

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Pope Benedict XVI Announces Resignation

Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation of the See of Rome today during a consistory during which three canonizations were also announced.

In his statement to the cardinals present at the consistory, the Holy Father said: "After having repeatedly examined my conscience before God, I have come to the certainty that my strengths,due to an advanced age, are no longer suited to an adequate exercise of the Petrine ministry. I am well aware that this ministry, due to its essential spiritual nature, must be carried out not only with words and deeds, but no less with prayer and suffering," Pope Benedict XVI told the cardinals at the consistory.

He continued: "However, in today's world, subject to so many rapid changes and shaken by questions of deep relevance for the life of faith, in orde rto govern the bark of Saint Peter and proclaim the Gospel, both strength of mind and body are necessary, strength which in the last few months, has deteriorated in me to the extent that I have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me."
For the full article, click here.

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Lent is Coming!
Ash Wednesday is February 13th!

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St. Pius X Catholic Student Center


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